New Homelessness “Data Dashboard” Highlights Harrell Administration’s Priorities—Including Sweeps

Mayor Bruce Harrell speaks outside the new Dockside Apartments near Green Lake Tuesday.
Mayor Bruce Harrell speaks outside the new Dockside Apartments near Green Lake Tuesday.

By Erica C. Barnett

Standing outside the  Dockside Apartments, a new Low-Income Housing Institute affordable housing project in Green Lake, Mayor Bruce Harrell rolled out an online dashboard on Tuesday that includes high-level information about housing and shelter projects that will move forward this year, the location of encampments the city has removed in the last several months, and the number of people Seattle outreach workers have referred to shelter at those encampment removals.

“For the first time in the city’s history, this dashboard that we’ve created allows the public to follow expansion of accessible shelter and supportive housing development, from the initial planning phase to their eventual opening,” Harrell said. The dashboard includes a list of 1,300 housing units and shelter beds that are either open or underway. “My administration has pledged to identify 2,000 [housing or shelter] units by the end of the year. So far, we’ve identified 1,300 expected to open this year.”

During his campaign for mayor, Harrell told reporters he would “identify” 1,000 units of “emergency, supportive shelter” in his first six months in office, with another 1,000 units in the six months after that. At the time, this was broadly interpreted to mean 1,000 new units (or shelter beds), not a progress report on units that were already underway. But a review of the 23 projects highlighted on the mayor’s dashboard—all of them funded or partially funded by the city and opening this year—shows that all of them were underway before Harrell took office. In other words, Harrell could have compiled an almost identical list at almost any point during his 2021 campaign.

“I didn’t spend a lot of time trying to figure out what the existing plans were, because quite candidly, they did not exist. And certainly not in a manner where you saw today where you can actually scroll over in a map and see what we’re dealing with.”—Mayor Bruce Harrell

For example: Chief Seattle Club’s 80-unit ?ál?al apartment building in Pioneer Square has been in the works since 2017, and opened, after many delays, earlier this year. JustCare, a program that provides long-term hotel-based shelter, has been around since 2020. And several Low Income Housing Institute-run tiny house villages have been in the works for years, but only opened recently because the previous mayoral administration repeatedly refused to spend funds allocated for the villages.

Harrell and two city council allies pushed back on the narrative that the housing and shelter in the dashboard was already in the works before he took office. Under previous administrations, Harrell said, “nothing was really identified because there was no plan. … I didn’t spend a lot of time trying to figure out what the existing plans were, because quite candidly, they did not exist. And certainly not in a manner where you saw today where you can actually scroll over in a map and see what we’re dealing with.”

District 6 Councilmember Dan Strauss, comparing Harrell to his foot-dragging predecessor Jenny Durkan, noted during a press briefing that “the mayor has the ability to move quickly or slowly with deploying housing units once they’re funded; what I’m seeing here is that there’s an urgency in place.” In other words: It isn’t the number of units or shelter beds in the pipeline that counts, but the fact that the city is moving to get them open.

The mayor’s dashboard also includes a bar graph showing the number of “offers of shelter” the city’s HOPE team, which does outreach to encampments the city is about to sweep, has made to people living in encampments. The graph shows this data as a “running tally” over several months; Seattle Human Services Department deputy director Michael Bailey said he did not know if the cumulative number, 513 referrals over five months, included duplicates—people who had received a shelter referral more than once.

As we’ve reported, the majority of unsheltered people who get a shelter referral from the city don’t actually end up staying in that shelter, making referrals a poor measure of shelter effectiveness. Asked why the city is tracking referrals rather than enrollments (the number of people who show up at a shelter and stay there for a night or longer), Deputy Mayor Tiffany Washington said it was because the city is legally required to track referrals.

People have the ability to get to shelter if they want to go, she added. “They’re adults. And when we say we’re going to go live somewhere, no one walks us to the place that we’re living to make sure we get there. Homeless people aren’t children. And if they say they’re going to go inside, then we trust that they’re going to go inside.”

Finally, the map includes a general estimate of the number of tents and RVs in various neighborhoods and the number of people who were on site at specific encampments when they were closed, according to the HOPE team. The total number of tents in the city in mid-May, according to the dashboard, was 763— an undercount, officials acknowledged Tuesday, because it only includes tents people have reported to the city.

They’re adults. And when we say we’re going to go live somewhere, no one walks us to the place that we’re living to make sure we get there. Homeless people aren’t children. And if they say they’re going to go inside, then we trust that they’re going to go inside.”—Deputy Mayor Tiffany Washington

Inside each general area, the map identifies encampments the city removed, along with (in some cases, but not all) the number of people who accepted shelter referrals from the HOPE Team. The purpose of this tracking, according to the dashboard, is as “a baseline to track progress” at removing encampments.

Washington said Tuesday that the city is seeking to apply an “equity lens” to encampments. What that meant, she explained was that the city will spend significant resources removing encampments in neighborhoods that have typically had fewer encampment sweeps, and where residents complaining about encampments may feel ignored. In the new system, complaints will “get more weight if you’re in places that are typically ignored. And so it’s not the squeakiest wheel. The squeakiest wheel way would mean that I live in North Seattle, and I got my whole neighborhood watch group to call 700 times,” it would elicit a response from the city, Washington said.

The data in the map does not appear to directly represent conditions in various neighborhoods. For example, according to the map, there were 183 tents in downtown Seattle as of mid-May—the most of any neighborhood—while there were only 15 tents in all of Capitol Hill. The map indicates there were no encampments at all in the University District, Madison Park, or Rainier Beach, and virtually none in most of North Seattle, including Lake City, while neighborhoods like Wallingford and Montlake reported dozens.

The fact that, in at least some cases, encampments appear more common because they are reported more frequently gets to a fundamental question about this “data collection” exercise: Who is all this information for? Unlike previous city maps and dashboards, or a more detailed system performance dashboard maintained by the authority, the website the Harrell Administration rolled out Tuesday appears aimed at reassuring housed residents that “problems” in their neighborhoods (visible encampments) are being addressed. It even includes information about how many people at each encampment the city removed “accepted” shelter, potentially contributing to the widespread misconception that homeless people don’t really want help..

Asked why parks workers are now flanked by police when they remove encampments, Washington said the parks department’s union “wrote the mayor and city council saying there must be SPD present, because our staff are being assaulted by protesters. So, one, now I have a legal obligation, per the union, to make sure cops are there, and second because the protesters there to help often don’t help.”

Encampment removals make up a relatively minor but significant chunk of the city’s budget—about $10 million, according to the city. “Despite popular opinion, we don’t spend all of our money on sweeps. We don’t even spend a large amount of our money on sweeps,” Washington said. Increasingly, that line item includes backup from police officers, who are now present at encampment removals—a departure from the policy adopted in 2020, which put city outreach workers at the head of an encampment response team formerly headed by police.

Asked why parks workers are now flanked by police when they remove encampments, Washington said the parks department’s union “wrote the mayor and city council saying there must be SPD present, because our staff are being assaulted by protesters. So, one, now I have a legal obligation, per the union, to make sure cops are there, and second because the protesters there to help often don’t help.” Actual assaults? “Yes.”

The city does not publish the locations of planned encampment removals publicly, Washington added, because they “want the least amount of commotion [possible] so that the people that are residing they’re trying to get inside aren’t harmed and disrupted and they can get their belongings packed up and move into a shelter without all of the theatrics.”

We have asked the city if they have any records of physical assaults on parks employees, and about the nature of its agreement to provide police protection to parks workers, and will update this post when we find out more.

9 thoughts on “New Homelessness “Data Dashboard” Highlights Harrell Administration’s Priorities—Including Sweeps”

  1. Where’s the documentation of Parks workers “being assaulted”???? I don’t think this has ever happened. I was at a sweep this morning where a half dozen cops were a block away and pretty much out of sight while the workers picked up litter 2 feet from where we were serving coffee. One of them offered us extra contractor trash bags if we needed them to help residents pack their belongings….that worker didn’t seem at all worried that we would assault him (and SPD was too far away and unable to see it if we had.) How much do we pay these cops to stand around for 2 hours doing nothing?

  2. Fantastic! Love to see some good affordable housing news. And a dashboard for homelessness services is badly needed and appreciated.

  3. Seattle has thousands of lower paid workers who struggle to pay for housing and live in substandard housing while filling some of the most important jobs in the City… starting with pouring me beer at my favorite bars! I feel for these people. I’d like the City to come up with a plan to help them find dignity and stability in housing. Seattle has largely turned it back on the working class.

    Just how much time and money can the City spend on the bat-shit crazy drug addicts stinking up our parks and neighborhoods? The City offers shelter, tries to work with these losers to help make a plan to help them…and they can’t even show up at a shelter when it’s offered. Because they don’t want to? Really? Haven’t we all done things we “didn’t want to” our whole lives? Maybe that’s why most us are not homeless.

    If folks are not willing to take a bed in a shelter, go to treatment, stop using…. nothing can honestly be done for them.

    From the article above….

    They’re adults. And when we say we’re going to go live somewhere, no one walks us to the place that we’re living to make sure we get there. Homeless people aren’t children. And if they say they’re going to go inside, then we trust that they’re going to go inside.”—Deputy Mayor Tiffany Washington

    1. That comment from Ms. Washington is one that stuck out for me, too. Her tone is inappropriate and defensive-as if she knows more than we do and this is going to be the new excuse, or one of them, for failure. I’d like to see her go away right now. She clearly has no clue that we are paying her and deserve a respectful and thoughtful answer.

    1. The website you provided has no mention of LIHI — instead, it is obviously for-profit housing presented by Redside Partners, not LIHI.

      1. When I commented above, I had not yet read the LIHI announcement that they had bought the Redside property and will turn it into affordable housing — bravo, LIHI!

      2. The very beginning of this article shows Mayor Harrell at the Dockside, the same place of the link I sent. That is the “low income housing” that will open in July. Redside Partners may have built it or be the agent for renting, or something else. The article linked below from the Mayor’s office makes clear that Seattle is giving LIHI plenty of millions to acquire the building: “Mayor Harrell shared the details of the One Seattle Homelessness Action Plan from the Dockside Apartments in Green Lake, where he also announced that the City is awarding $18.9 million to the Low Income Housing Institute to acquire Dockside Apartments and open the building as affordable housing this summer. Dockside will provide 70 new permanent homes for individuals experiencing homelessness, and an additional 22 homes for individuals earning up to 50% of the Area Median Income ($45,300). ”

        https://harrell.seattle.gov/2022/05/31/mayor-harrell-releases-one-seattle-homelessness-action-plan-and-transparency-dashboard-announces-acquisition-of-dockside-apartments/

        So, you might consider doing some research yourself if you’d like to catch up.

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